We all want some warmer days, but a series of fast moving cold fronts will nix any hopes of a warm up for the next six to 10 days! I’m tracking at least three strong cold fronts that will zip through the region between Thursday and early next week.

These weather systems are called Alberta Clippers. They originate in the Canadian province of Alberta and move swiftly like maritime Clipper ships zipped across the ocean. These “Clippers” are lined up like airplanes waiting to land at a busy airport, and the weather pattern is set up perfectly for these bitterly cold blasts of air to make a solid landing in Kansas City.

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 Just follow the blue arrows on the map above. Note how the blue arrows extend from the northwest territories of Canada all the way into the deep south of the United States. Wednesday afternoon temperatures in the northwest territories ranged from 20 to 27 below zero across this frozen expanse of snowy land.

That’s a mighty cold source region for our repeated shots of wintry air so I see no reason why we won’t be in the deep freeze for most of the next 6 to 10 days. The first of these bitter cold fronts arrives Thursday in the middle of the day.

After a morning high temperature in the middle 20s on Thursday, a fierce north wind will take over and by Thursday evening our temperatures will be in the teens.

A very strong high-pressure system with a sea level air pressure near 30.56 (normal air pressure is 29.92) will build into the Kansas City area Thursday night and Friday morning. The sky should be clear, the wind should be light and morning temperatures Friday should be near zero.

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There is a small and brief warm up over the weekend with highs in the upper 30s Saturday and mid 40s by Sunday. But right on the heels of the mini warm up comes another blast from Canada.

Our third clipper races into the upper Great Lakes Monday morning. This storm system drags another strong cold front through the Missouri river valley. Monday’s fast flying front could bring some snow showers to Kansas City but will definitely bring another doozy of a dose of cold air.

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Our forecast falls in line with the Climate Prediction Center’s latest 6 to 10-day outlook. The CPC keeps most of the eastern United States below average through the end of January. If you really drill down on this map, you’ll see the Kansas City sits between an 80 and 90-percent chance of seeing below average temperatures for rest of the month.

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So, congratulations! You not only made it to the end of this blog, you’ve also made it through the average coldest part of Winter. That’s right, the average high and average low temperature will only climb higher from this point forward until the middle of July.

The graphic below shows how average temperatures warm between now and the end of February.

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Yes, at first, the warm up is slow but steady. By the end of February, which is just six weeks away, our daily average high temperature is near 50 degrees. Hopefully that will make you feel better, especially since this blog, like this series of cold fronts, clipped any hopes of late January thaw.

Remember, Spring is 55 days away!

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