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Did Elizabeth Olsen get married? That's what fans are thinking, after she referred to Robbie Arnett as her "husband." ET has reached out to Olsen's rep for comment. The WandaVision star appeared to have revealed her updated relationship status on Variety's Actors on Actorsseries. The video, published on Tuesday, showed Olsen chatting with Kaley Cuoco about her Marvel series and more. "I'm in a bathroom," Olsen confessed during their conversation. "I've been in the U.K. for seven months, and I got back two days ago, and my neighbor is doing so much construction to their backyard. I can still hear it and I’m in the furthest bathroom.""I also just noticed that my husband put Little Miss Magic. You know, the Little Miss books?" she added, referring to the decor in the room. "They're these classic books but 'magic' because of WandaVision because he's such a f**king cutie!"News broke in August 2019 that Olsen and Arnett were engaged, though the private pair never confirmed or commented on the news themselves. The actress and the Milo Greene frontman had been romantically linked since March 2017, and made their first red carpet appearance as a couple in September that year. The Avengers star has stayed private about her personal life, telling Modern Luxury magazine in 2017 that she's learned tips on how to handle reporters from her older sisters, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen."They're very tight-lipped -- notoriously so. I was not caring what I was saying [in interviews] because I'd assumed no one would read it," she explained. "They'd say, 'You know, even if you don’t think anyone’s going to read this article, someone might pull the quote later for [something else].' It's all part of how you hope someone interprets you, and how they frame who you are and the work you do," Olsen added. See more on the star in the video below.  RELATED CONTENT: Elizabeth Olsen on Why it Was Meta Filming 'WandaVision' After Growing Up on the Set of 'Full House'This video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.Elizabeth Olsen to Star in HBO Max Limited Series ''Love and Death'John Stamos Shares Flashback of Elizabeth Olsen on 'Full House' SetElizabeth Olsen Teases a 'Full House' Easter Egg in 'WandaVision'

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When Debra Jo Rupp was cast on WandaVision, it became one of those art-imitates-life-imitates-art situations. On the show -- Marvel Studio's first foray into television -- she plays Mrs. Hart, the inquiring wife of Vision's new boss. On set, Rupp found herself equally curious about the puzzle box she'd found herself in."You get your part and there's only so much you know," she tells ET's Ash Crossan. "Then if you need to know more, I am like a gnat. When I have a question, I will ask 200 people until I get the answer. So, I did find out probably some disallowed things."Not that she necessarily could explain it all now. The premise of the series -- Marvel superheroes by way of classic sitcoms -- proved even stranger to Rupp since she wasn't familiar with the MCU to begin with. "They said, 'We want you to be a part of this. It's kind of weird. It's very hard to explain, but we'll do the best we can.'" It was her iconic portrayal of Kitty Forman on That '70s Show, in part, that drew director Matt Shakman to cast her opposite Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany."They needed someone who knew sitcom, because it was the beginning of their filming and the others didn't have as much experience," Rupp explains, "and then they needed someone who could do drama, which he knew from my theater [work]. They sort of tried to explain it to me, none of which I understood. Like, none. Like, zip. And I did it because my great nephew said, 'Aunt Debby, if you don't do this, I will never speak to you again.'"Marvel StudiosWandaVision's '50s-set first episode was filmed in front of a live studio audience, a new experience for Olsen and Bettany, but which Rupp was no stranger to after filming eight seasons of That '70s Show in front of an audience -- with one Thanos-sized exception."The live audience was coming to see Marvel. They weren't coming to see a sitcom," she recalls. "So, when we started this as a sitcom, you could just feel, like, heavy confusion. Like 'What...?!' They recognized Lizzie and Paul, but they were confused. And I loved it. I just loved it!"Episode 1 sees Wanda and Vision hosting a dinner party for his boss, Arthur (Fred Melamed), and Mrs. Hart. (For comic book readers, their characters might call to mind poor George and Nora from Tom King's The Vision.) Hijinks and hilarity lead to an "Old MacDonald" singalong, but when Arthur begins choking during the meal, Mrs. Hart has a rather strange reaction and the super-couple's sitcom life warps into The Twilight Zone. "I get to do, like, the first crack," Rupp grins.Since the episode dropped, Rupp has been inundated online with theories and some "very bizarre questions," and since she knows a bit more than she's perhaps supposed to, she also knows which viewers are closer to figuring it out than others. "There was one person that was kind of very close." Many suspect there's more to the Westview neighbors than meets the eye, so we asked Rupp: Are we right to be intrigued by Mrs. Hart and what she could possibly be a part of in the future?She pauses for five full seconds, then smiles and simply says, "Yes."New episodes of WandaVision stream Fridays on Disney+.RELATED CONTENT:How a Lunch With Dick Van Dyke Helped Inspire Marvel's 'WandaVision'Paul Bettany Says 'WandaVision' Is More 'Epic & Crazy' Than 'Endgame'Kathryn Hahn Reveals Why 'WandaVision' Proved 'Irresistible' to Her‘WandaVision’ Director Matt Shakman on Unraveling the Show’s Big MysteryThis video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.Embed CodeRestart

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Don't touch that dial, WandaVision is nearly here. And when it debuts, Disney+'s first-ever Marvel series will beam fans into a new adventure for Elizabeth Olsen's Wanda Maximoff and Paul Bettany's Vision, a channel-hopping, reality-bending romp through decades of sitcom tropes as the super-powered couple seeks domestic bliss in a world that may not be what it seems."There's not a lot of opportunities like this show out in the world," Olsen tells ET. "As an actor, it was so wild and fun to really lean into all of these different decades through American sitcom."The first episode of WandaVision -- the first new MCU content since 2019's Spider-Man: Far From Home -- kicks off in the 1960s with what Olsen describes as a "full thrust into sitcom land," Dick Van Dyke Show-style, broadcasting in black-and-white with background laughs provided by a real studio audience. "Having the audience there, and having two days to shoot an episode is something that I'd never experienced in my life," she says.Though the actress has now played Wanda in multiple Marvel outings -- beginning with a post-credits cameo in 2014's Captain America: The Winter Soldier -- getting into character was completely different this time around. Instead of the low-register, Sokovian accent we're accustomed to, this Wanda channels her best Donna Reed, right down to the apron strings."There's a lot of vocal warmups that have to be done," Olsen explains of pitching her voice up for a cheery lilt. "I do enjoy the mannerisms and the femininity of it. I think that's always fun for me, because I feel I'm just, like, a clumsy, masculine woman or something. It's really fun for me to be very effeminate."Marvel StudiosMarvel StudiosThe sitcom world, of course, isn't a completely foreign atmosphere for Olsen, who grew up watching big sisters Mary-Kate and Ashley star on Full House. That, however, only made the experience all the more "surreal." "I have such old, early memories of being on the audience side, and it felt so comfortable," she recalls. "I felt so comfortable as a child. And here I was doing something that felt so foreign as an actor."And yes, there is even a "very meta" nod to Full House in WandaVision. "I was very excited to do it!" Olsen laughs, noting that her ever-supportive siblings will soon see the reference for themselves. "They always watch the [MCU films] that I'm in, which is great."As for casual Marvel fans, fear not. A complete 23-movie, 3,000-minute rewatch of Marvel's cinematic universe is not required viewing ahead of WandaVision."I think this is an experience where people can come in with fresh eyes," Olsen assures. "I really think that if you're just in it for the ride and you kind of know that these people are superheroes and you can extend your imagination to what that then means, it's just a fun ride and it all answers itself within the show."I feel like we might have a few first-timers out there!" she adds, "so I'm excited for those experiences."As much as the series builds on the canon that came before it -- including the return a few familiar faces -- this is Wanda and Vision's story, first and foremost. And still, Olsen is excited she's able to help launch a new era of players within this world, like Kathryn Hahn, who joins the MCU as the mysterious Agnes, and Teyonah Parris as a grown-up Monica Rambeau."I am so in love with Kathryn Hahn! She is so funny -- humor is just a part of every bone in her body -- and she's so talented," Olsen raves. "I am so grateful that I got to have her in my life for the past year."As for Parris, whose character fans met as a wide-eyed kid in Captain Marvel but is now having world-shaping adventures of her own, Olsen says, "I'm such a fan of hers, as an actor before she joined us, and this was an amazing opportunity to kind of set her off on the next Marvel adventure she'll have!"WandaVision premieres Jan. 15 on Disney+.RELATED CONTENT:Paul Bettany Says 'WandaVision' Is More 'Epic & Crazy' Than 'Endgame' Upcoming Marvel Movies and TV From 'WandaVision to 'Fantastic Four'How to Watch Marvel's 'WandaVision' on Disney+New ‘WandaVision’ Trailer Takes Us Through the Decades in Reality-Bending VentureThis video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.Embed CodeRestart

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For everybody who suspected Vision is the Dick Van Dyke of the Avengers members, has Marvel got a show for you: WandaVision, the studio's first offering on Disney+, sees the beet-hued synthezoid (Paul Bettany) and his witchy other half, Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), get up to all sorts of hijinks and ensuing hilarity through the prism of classic sitcoms.The series bops along from era to era to era -- and from The Dick Van Dyke Show and Bewitched to The Brady Bunch and Full House -- as a Marvel-sized mystery unfurls around Wanda and Vision about how and why they've found themselves in this small screen reality. Comic book readers know the couple's history on the page can get very, very, very dark -- especially with Bettany confirming to ET two of the show's main comic inspirations -- so, what happens when the laugh track stops laughing?Ahead of WandaVision's premiere, Bettany hopped on a Zoom call to talk resurrecting Vision, ditching the full-body paint for one particularly off-putting wig and why the series might be more "epic and crazy" than even Avengers: Endgame.ET: When Vision died in Infinity War, did you know that he would live on -- however it is he's living on -- in WandaVision? Or had you thought that was the end of the road?Paul Bettany: I was sort of 85 percent certain that was the end of the road. My contract was up. I had died twice. [Laughs] And then I got a call from the boss saying, "Can you come in the office?" I looked at Jen [Connelly], I went, "Ah, the boss has called me in the office. You know what that means." So, I went in and I didn't want anybody to feel uncomfortable, so I said, "Kevin, Louis, it's been great. No hard feelings. Thank you so much. I totally understand." They went, "Wait, are you quitting?" And I went, "No. Aren't you firing me?" And they went, "No. Uh, we're about to pitch a TV show to you." And I went, "Oh! OK, cool! I'm in." And then they decided to pitch it anyway. And it was so mad and bonkers, and I fell in love with it immediately.Was it a rundown of the entire series at that point? Or was it the first kernel of an idea they shared with you?It was the kernel of an idea. And it was a mashup between two comic storylines that I'm very familiar with, then with a sort of journey through American sitcoms throughout the eras. [Laughs] Which is a crazy idea!What were the comics they pinpointed for you in that first meeting?There's a great one called The Vision -- and it's the Visions in suburbia -- and there is House of M, which is a masterpiece. And then mixed in with The Dick Van Dyke Show.Tom King's The Vision is an incredible and also incredibly dark book.It's a very dark book, yep!The sitcoms of it all obviously makes this different from anything Marvel has done before. But were there other ways in which it felt different being the co-lead of this project after playing a supporting role in these massive Avengers movies?Yeah. Although I would argue with Kathryn [Hahn] and Teyonah [Parris], it feels like an ensemble anyway. And there are so many great actors that we have in the show that follow us through the decades, and they were brilliant. But yes, it was a lot more work. [Laughs] There was a lot more work and a lot more days in a row wearing the makeup, which ends up being quite painful. The thing that's painful about it is taking it off, actually, and so they built a really tiny, tiny sauna that I could go in at the end of the day with like a gin and tonic and sit there for 20 minutes and start to sweat it off, so you're not scrubbing this thing off with an abrasive brush.I think Dave Bautista told me once that's how he gets his Drax makeup off. He has the same sort of sauna.I heard that. I think that's where we got the idea. In fact, I think initially I was in his sauna. It was a much bigger sauna than I needed, and so I got a little wee one that was easier to move around.You got more days out of the makeup than you usually do on one of these Marvel gigs. That had to be nice. I guess it was out of the makeup and into a wig.Out of the makeup, into a wig, yeah, and into these amazing costumes. We had so much fun creating these characters and creating all of these looks and running around the American Century and sitcoms. It was a magical time.Do you name your wigs?[Laughs] You know what, I don't have names for my wigs. But I should. And I think from now on, I'm going to name them. I can tell you that Elizabeth had a name for my 1980s wig.What was that name?Mr. Creepy. She hated the fact that I didn't have sideburns on it. She said, "I hate it. It's so weird. Why don't you have sideburns?" And I said, "Because it was a wedge, and that was the style." She went, "It's creepy!" [Laughs]Marvel StudiosI think a lot of people are going to be surprised by how damn funny you are in this. You've dipped into the space before -- I'm thinking of Wimbledon, which was, you know, a full-on rom-com -- but what was the experience of tapping back into doing more straightforward comedy for you?It was so much fun. I haven't done that sort of thing since Wimbledon and A Knight's Tale and certainly not the physical comedy of it. You know, I grew up on those shows. In the '70s in England, on Saturdays and Sundays, there were reruns of I Love Lucy and The Dick Van Dyke Show, and so I was familiar with it, but when we started prepping for this, I really got into watching them, and Lizzie and I looked at each other at one point and went, "There's a lot more to this!" The skill that those guys and gals had-- They were song-and-dance people that could do anything. The physical humor and the physical manifestation of jokes and stuff, when you're used to trying to do things small for camera and stuff, you really feel like you're putting it all out there.And I was in awe of Lizzie watching these episodes. She is given so much to do and is just masterful in all of it. Looking back, was there a moment that even you remember being surprised by what she was bringing to this?Frankly, seeing her and Kathryn when we got onto set -- I mean, maybe we only ran it through once before we had to do it in front of an audience -- and the first episode and "This is going to be a gas!" and all of that stuff and seeing both of them. Oh! And I remember Lizzie walking down the garden path from the door to come and meet me and the way she held her hands and her elbows was just so accurate and so of that period. I thought she was brilliant. And that Mid-Atlantic accent that she got in the first couple of shows, it's just really great to watch.Before I let you go, I remember when this was announced at Comic-Con, you said you had so many questions about the who and the what and the when and the how of WandaVision. I know you can't give away any of that, but can you tell me: Were all of your questions answered by the final episode?Yes. I think my hope for the show is that it brings in a new audience of people who are going to enjoy that sort of nostalgia. It's an homage to all of those shows. There's nothing that is satire about them. We love those shows, and they're lovingly recreated. I can promise you the amount of effort that went into making them look accurate and shoot them in exactly the same way. The second thing is, I think for dyed-in-the-wool Marvel fans, it's going to really expand their understanding of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and allow them to see the direction in which the Marvel Cinematic Universe is moving. And I think it will be incredibly fulfilling. You've seen three episodes, correct?Yes.So, whilst we are definitely in sitcoms right now, let me assure you that this series, WandaVision, has more special effects requirements than Endgame. So, we are heading somewhere really, really epic and crazy.WandaVision premieres on Jan. 15 on Disney+.RELATED CONTENT:How to Watch Marvel's 'WandaVision' on Disney+Elizabeth Olsen Teases a 'Full House' Easter Egg in 'WandaVision'Marvel Debuts New Trailers for 'Loki' and 'Falcon and Winter Soldier'New ‘WandaVision’ Trailer Takes Us Through the Decades in Reality-Bending VentureThis video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.Embed CodeRestart

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Marvel is back. The MCU is kicking off a 2021 plethora of TV shows and movies with WandaVision, which stars Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany and brings the super-powered beings to suburban-life -- though everything is not as it seems. The upcoming Marvel show will arrive on Disney+ on Jan. 15, and also stars Teyonah Parris, Kat Dennings, Randall Park and Kathryn Hahn.Following WandaVision, even more of Marvel's big-screen heroes will get a slot on Disney+, including The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, which premieres March 19, Black Widow, which arrives May 7 and Loki, which is also due in May.Here's everything you need to know for how to watch WandaVision on Disney+.When does Marvel's WandaVision premiere? Friday, Jan. 15, 2021How to watch WandaVision on Disney+: You just have to subscribe to Disney+, which costs $6.99 per month or $69.99 per year.That about covers it! Watch the video below for more on Marvel's genre-bending undertaking with WandaVision.New ‘WandaVision’ Trailer Takes Us Through the Decades in Reality-Bending VentureThis video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.Embed CodeRestartRELATED CONTENT:'WandaVision' Teases More Clues to the Superhero-Sitcom CrossoverUpcoming Marvel Movies and TV From 'WandaVision to 'Fantastic Four'Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany Were 'Blown Away' by 'WandaVision' Pitch (Exclusive)