Study: 54 percent of US households rely entirely on cell phones, no landlines

When your phone rings at home, what kind of phone is it? New numbers show that not everyone has "cut the cord" on phone service. (Graphicstock)

When your phone rings at home, what kind of phone is it? New numbers show that not everyone has "cut the cord" on phone service.

Google "landline" and first few links that pop up in the search are definitions and explainers about what a landline is and how it works -- just in case the kids these days need a little background for what we’re talking about.

But, people still use landlines. It is just a lot less than even a year or two ago.

A study conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics found more than half of US households, 53.9 percent, rely entirely on cell phones, no landlines. Which also means nearly half of US households still have landlines.

It is hard to tell which part of that stat is more surprising. But, either way you look at it, it’s a huge change from a 2006 survey when only 15.8 percent of US households said they didn’t have landlines.

Going from 15 to 53 percent of households with landlines in just over 10 years is a pretty big jump.

There are pros and cons to both, but the biggest benefit survey respondents like about wireless over landline was having more control over when you’re available, with things like do not disturb settings and connecting one phone to multiple numbers rerouting calls depending on who’s calling.

One of the researchers explained the trend by pointing out that 10 years ago it was considered “risky” to cut your landline. And today, it more just common sense.

Copyright 2018 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

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