The small business Phil Glynn owns in the Crossroads District of Kansas City is focused on helping indigenous communities around the country.

Glynn is running for elected office for the first time, but he is no stranger to politics.

The Kansas City native has served in several positions for the Jackson County Democrats.

Glynn says the focus for his first mayoral race is workforce development.

Steve Miller is a relatively unknown in the landscape of Kansas City politics.

The career lawyer jumped in the 2019 race before it was crowded. A recent poll put Miller in a strong second spot.

Miller has a three-point plan for easing crime in the city including work in neighborhoods and he wants to review eviction procedures citywide.

Elected at 25, Jermaine Reed was the youngest person elected in the city’s history. He held his council seat after winning re-election in 2015.

Since 2011, Reed’s focused his efforts on revitalizing the 3rd District including the additions of two grocery stores to the area; one in 2014 and one in 2018.

During the last year, he’s been a supporter of changing part of The Paseo to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.

Alissia Canady is one of two women in the crowded 2019 field.

As a former assisting prosecuting attorney for Jackson County, Canady is familiar with the struggles facing families in Kansas City.

She is almost at the end of her first term on city council, originally elected to fill the 5th District seat in 2015.

During her time as a city councilor, Canady put her efforts behind several city improvement efforts including housing supporting projects like Love Thy Neighbor and initiatives to update 18th and Vine.

Quinton Lucas is not the only native Kansas Citian in the 2019 race, but he says it’s being a native that helps him know what the city needs going forward.

Outside of this 3rd District seat, Lucas is a University of Kansas law professor.

After dealing with homelessness as a child, he points to keep Kansas City affordable and utilizing incentives to help people stay in their homes.

Sixth District Councilman Scott Taylor may be best known for selling Kemper Arena for $1.

He’s been supporting south Kansas City; bringing a new Cerner campus to the district.

Taylor says he’ll focus on not just big project like the new Hy-Vee Arena but also small scale projects that directly impact neighborhoods across the city.

If elected, Taylor says he’d be an advocate for transparent government.

Justus may be leading in one of the few polls seen before the April 2 primary, but her name recognition could go a long way with voters in 2019.

In the 4th District chair, Justus spent much of last year working on the new single-terminal KCI project which is delayed and costing more money than originally anticipated.

Justus also focused on criminal justice reform. She chaired the Violent Crime Task Force and promises to continue her work for stronger gun legislation if she’s elected.

The 2019 election is the third time Henry Klein is vying for the city’s top spot.

Klein also launched a campaign in 2015 to represent the 6th District.

He may be a political outsider, but Klein has a clear vision for what his priorities would be if elected.

Education is at the top of Klein’s list, angling to bring Lebron James’ famed I Promise School to Kansas City, MO.

His fundraising efforts are not main stream either. Currently, he’s raised $200 dollars through a GoFundMe account. Much of his campaign infrastructure is coming from personal loans.

Scott Wagner is the mayor pro-tem.

As one of several Kansas City natives running for the top spot, Wagner has neighborhoods as on of the pillars of his platform.

For Wagner, letting Kansas Citians age in place means more stable neighborhoods.

Campaign 2019 Coverage

Caroline Sweeney joined KCTV5 News in December 2016.

This page is dedicated to the candidates running in the 2019 Kansas City Mayoral Primary.

KCTV5 News started airing candidate profiles on March 2-3. They will continue on March 9-10. The days the candidates stories aired on KCTV5 were chosen at random.

You can find the stories we’ve aired attached to the candidate profiles. Along with profiles, KCTV5 has information you need to know before you head to the polls.