Pfizer and Moderna are testing their vaccines against UK coronavirus variant

In this July 27, 2020, file photo, a nurse prepares a shot as a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway in Binghamton, N.Y. The U.S. is poised to give the green light as early as Friday, Dec. 18, to a second COVID-19 vaccine, a critical new weapon against the surging coronavirus. Doses of the vaccine developed by Moderna Inc. and the National Institutes of Health will give a much-needed boost to supplies as the biggest vaccination effort in the nation's history continues.

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -- The maker of a popular coronavirus vaccine says similar technology could be used to tackle other dangerous viruses.

Moderna announced it will use its messenger RNA technology for experimental treatments of the seasonal flu, H.I.V. and the Nipah virus.

The pharmaceutical company believes its MRNA technology could help treat viruses that have, quote, "eluded traditional vaccine efforts."

Human trials on Moderna's flu vaccines are expected to begin later this year. The company also plans to begin clinical trials for two experimental vaccines against H.I.V. later this year.

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