Defendant in NCAA bribery investigation changes tone on submissi - KCTV5 News

Defendant in NCAA bribery investigation changes tone on submission of cell phone evidence

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On Monday, Gatto wrote a letter to the judge withdrawing his opposition to suppress cell phone evidence. (Facebook/NCAA Men's College Basketball) On Monday, Gatto wrote a letter to the judge withdrawing his opposition to suppress cell phone evidence. (Facebook/NCAA Men's College Basketball)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

An Adidas executive at the center of the ongoing investigation into the bribery of college athletes has had a change of heart about an element of the case.

After news of the investigation broke, Adidas executive James Gatto, his attorneys and a pair of other defendants traded motions with prosecutors about suppressing evidence found in their cell phones.

On Monday, Gatto wrote a letter to the judge withdrawing his opposition to suppress cell phone evidence.

Two other defendants, Adidas executive Merl Code and sports agent Christian Dawkins, still oppose their cell phone records being released.

The ongoing investigation alleges that expense reports and balance sheets from a sports agency list cash advances, as well as entertainment and travel expenses for several high school and college players and their families.

At least 20 NCAA Division I basketball programs and more than 25 current and former players were named in the documents, according to a report from Yahoo Sports in February.

Universities mentioned in the report include the University of Kansas, Wichita State University, Duke University, the University of North Carolina, the University of Texas, the University of Kentucky, Michigan State University, University of Southern California, the University of Alabama and others. 

On April 10, a federal indictment was passed down, alleging that KU paid thousands of dollars to the mother of a top high school recruit.

Prosecutors say an Adidas representative agreed to pay $90,000 to the family of a Kansas recruit and $40,000 to a recruit at North Carolina State.

Prosecutors say money helped secure the players' commitments to play college basketball at the schools and ensured the North Carolina State recruit signed an Adidas sponsorship deal when he entered the NBA. He entered the draft last June.

Kansas issued a statement following the indictment, saying the university was “listed as a victim.”

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