Kansas City hospital offers hope for expecting mothers with Type - KCTV5 News

Kansas City hospital offers hope for expecting mothers with Type-1 diabetes

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Stephanie Burns found out at age 13 that she had Type-1 diabetes. That’s when doctors told her she likely would never be a mom. (KCTV5) Stephanie Burns found out at age 13 that she had Type-1 diabetes. That’s when doctors told her she likely would never be a mom. (KCTV5)
Stephanie wore a special device checking her blood sugar every five minutes of the day and pricking her finger up to 10 times per day. (KCTV5) Stephanie wore a special device checking her blood sugar every five minutes of the day and pricking her finger up to 10 times per day. (KCTV5)
Stephanie, now a mother of two, says it was well worth the pain. (KCTV5) Stephanie, now a mother of two, says it was well worth the pain. (KCTV5)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

Struggling to get pregnant is something many families know all too well. 

And for women with Type-1 diabetes, doctors warn they shouldn't even try, due to high risk of complication.

But now, one local hospital is helping such patients give birth to healthy children after years of being told they couldn't.

St. Luke’s Hospital calls it their maternal-fetal medicine program.

A woman who went through the program is sharing her story, in hopes of helping others.

 “It was a really hard diagnosis. It's not something easy on families,” mother Stephanie Burns said.

Burns found out at age 13 that she had Type-1 diabetes. That’s when doctors told her she likely would never be a mom.

But, as she got older, she was determined to try.

“I knew that if we wanted to try and have children, I would need to have a team with me,” Burns said.

That led her to St. Luke’s, and to Dr. Devon Ramaeker.

The risks facing Type-1 diabetic patients are serious.

“Increased risk of miscarriage, birth defects, pre-term birth and pre-eclampsia,” Burns said.

Combatting that, and having a successful pregnancy, is no easy task for patients like Burns.

It’s not just a grueling, demanding nine months, the work begins long before conception.

“It takes planning and it actually has to occur prior to conceiving so we really encourage moms to plan their pregnancies and to seek out maternal-fetal medicine,” Dr. Ramaeker said.

 Stephanie’s husband Jordan was by her side through it all.

“Watching her go through it, you just see one of the most disciplined people and she has to be in order for us to have healthy children,” Jordan said.

Stephanie wore a special device checking her blood sugar every five minutes of the day and pricking her finger up to 10 times per day.

Doctors’ appointments and specialist visits, happened weekly. Leaving Stephanie feeling like she lived at the hospital for nine months.

Stephanie, now a mother of two, says it was well worth the pain.

“You can have a healthy pregnancy. You can have healthy children. Just partner with a physician that you trust because you're going to be almost living there for nine months,” Burns said.

The Burns’ have also received more good news. Both of their children are diabetes free, something that any diabetic parent worries about.

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