Kansas City area daycares participate in active shooter training - KCTV5

Kansas City area daycares participate in active shooter training

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Child Care Aware of America is leading the first active shooter response training aimed specifically at daycare providers for infants, toddlers and young children. (KCTV5) Child Care Aware of America is leading the first active shooter response training aimed specifically at daycare providers for infants, toddlers and young children. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

Child Care Aware of America is leading the first active shooter response training aimed specifically at daycare providers for infants, toddlers and young children.

They will be going over how to formulate a plan and how to use everyday items to be prepared and barricade a door if there is an active shooter.

“What we’ve got here, is just a bunch of stuff that you would have normally laying around in a classroom. So we’ve got electrically cords, belts, doorstops, we’ve got some rope, purse straps, but they are all effective tools in barricading a door," said Andrew Roszak, senior director of emergency preparedness.

Child care providers got hands-on training for what they should do in case there’s ever an active shooter.

When it comes to daycare, it can be challenging.

“The issue is, every church, every elementary school, every university kind of looks the same, but when you look at child care, they are all very, very different," Roszak said.

Roszak says the best thing you can do to prepare is plan ahead.

On Monday, they showed providers how to make an emergency plan specific to their building and their children. That means making sure people can’t just walk in.

Roszak also wants teachers to stock rooms with items to barricade a door, have ways to get infants and toddlers out quickly and be able to explain what’s happening to small children, so they understand what to do as well.

And if worst comes to the worst, teachers also need to know how to try to stop the gunman.

“It’s a little scary, as a parent and as an educator and child care provider ... protecting our children is a lot harder now than it was," said Natasha Lehman, program director at Northland Early Education Center.

Lehman also has two young kids. She jumped at the opportunity to have this kind of training.

“I think I feel better prepared doing stuff like this knowing that the teachers of my children are going to be better educated and have the knowledge and the skills to protect my children as well as the other children in my class," she said.

This training is going to Topeka and Wichita next. Organizers say the response has been huge, and they are planning for more trainings in the future.

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