Free DNA kits offered for adoptees searching for family - KCTV5

Free DNA kits offered for adoptees searching for family

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Caryn Brown is hoping for a free kit. She lives in KCK and has tried two other companies before. (KCTV5) Caryn Brown is hoping for a free kit. She lives in KCK and has tried two other companies before. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

The company My Heritage is giving away 15,000 free DNA kits to help people find their biological family.

“We have seen amazing reunions taking place! If you are an adoptee it’s very, very difficult because there is no paper record. Often, they don’t have access to or aren’t allowed the paper records,” said Rafi Mendelsohn, a spokesman with My Heritage.

For years, people have been cracking open sealed adoption by using DNA kits. They may not find a parent but they can often find a solid lead. It’s called "genetic genealogy"

Most biological families make a positive connection when they find each other. However, adoptions experts warn about 3-5 percent of biological parents do not want to make contact ever. Some connections do end in heartbreak.

Adoptees searching for answers and connections sometimes expose family secrets.

Kansas City, KS woman uses genetic geneology

Caryn Brown is hoping for a free kit. She lives in KCK and has tried two other companies before.

“It’s exciting. You hope you’ll find out something,” Brown said.

Brown has found second cousin but no direct connections. Brown was found abandoned as a baby at the Union Station in Denver in 1944. Her story was even featured in the local newspaper as police searched for her mother. After six months of foster care, she was adopted by a loving family.

“I grew up in such a good family there’s no hard feelings ... I’m sure it was a tough thing to do to lay a baby down and walk away,” Brown said.

Brown started her search late in life because she didn’t want to offend her adoptive parents. They have both now passed away. She suspects her biological parents probably have too. But, she wonders if there are brothers and sisters out there. She hopes to better understand why she was abandoned and perhaps gain medical information.

“It’s just always been kind of a wonder. I wonder what?” questioned Brown.

Priority will be given to people who can’t afford DNA kits. If you are interested head to dnaquest.org.

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