Firefighters: 5 kids, 2 adults sickened by carbon monoxide in Ka - KCTV5 News

Firefighters: 5 kids, 2 adults sickened by carbon monoxide in Kansas City, KS

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Seven people have been hospitalized due to high carbon monoxide levels inside their home, authorities say. (AP) Seven people have been hospitalized due to high carbon monoxide levels inside their home, authorities say. (AP)
KANSAS CITY, KS (KCTV) -

Seven people have been hospitalized due to high carbon monoxide levels inside their home, authorities say.

Firefighters were called to the home in 3000 block of North 29th Street about 10 a.m. Thursday.

A resident called 911 complaining of dizziness, headaches and pain. When crews arrived they found find high levels of carbon monoxide in the residence. 

Two adults, two toddlers and three teenagers were taken to an area hospital for evaluation and treatment.

Investigators say unvented propane heaters were a possible cause of the high levels of carbon monoxide.

Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas created when fuels burn incompletely. 

“It was due to exposure of a furnace that needed to have maintenance on it,” said Kansas City, KS, Fire Battalion Chief Morris Letcher.

The dangers of carbon monoxide exposure are dependent on many variables, including the victim’s age, health and activity level.  A person can be poisoned by a small amount of carbon monoxide over a longer period of time or by a large amount over a shorter amount of time.

Letcher says you never use propane or generators indoors because there isn’t proper ventilation for them. 

“If these gases can’t escape, they are either stuck in that room, which causes a problem or they escape through the cracks in the ventilation and duct work and so often times it can travel through the duct into a room where you might be sleeping and you don’t know your exposure is what it is,” Letcher said.

Letcher didn’t say what the reading was in the home but a healthy adult has no symptoms at 50 parts per million. At 400 part per millions, headaches are present and exposure could be deadly after a few hours. At 1,600, it is deadly within one hour.

Letcher recommends that everyone has a carbon monoxide detector and that you should check them as often as you check your smoke detector. 

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