Missouri lawmaker proposes bill to keep kids in rear-facing car - KCTV5 News

Missouri lawmaker proposes bill to keep kids in rear-facing car seats until age 2

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Now, Missouri Representative Brandon Ellington wants to change that, making the law that requires all children under the age of two be in a rear-facing car seat. (CBS) Now, Missouri Representative Brandon Ellington wants to change that, making the law that requires all children under the age of two be in a rear-facing car seat. (CBS)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

A Missouri lawmaker is trying to end the confusion for parents when it comes to how long they should keep children in a rear-facing car seat.

In Missouri, children only have to be one-year-old or weigh 20 pounds to go from a rear-facing car seat to a forward-facing one.

Now, Missouri Representative Brandon Ellington wants to change that, making the law that requires all children under the age of two be in a rear-facing car seat.

Ellington says car crashes are the leading death among children in the United States. He says the bill would act as an additional safeguard and would take the guess-work out of the weight requirement.

Parents in the Kansas City area have mixed opinions about the proposed bill.

“I really think it’s up to the parents because sometimes after age one, you have a very large child, like my four-year-old weighs 65 pounds and had he been rear-facing until age two, he wouldn’t have fit,” parent Brooke Taylor said.

“I am actually all for it,” parent Brandy Cox said. “I have a five-year-old that we had rear-facing until three years and a couple months.”

Rear-facing car seats support a child’s head, neck and spine and are designed to distribute the crash forces across the entire car seat.

According to AAA, two-year-olds are five times less likely to die or be seriously injured in a crash if they ride in a rear-facing car seat.

"I’d rather our kids be safe than sorry and their spines are still so fragile and still growing so I don’t see anything…I don’t have a problem with it,” Cox said. “I’d rather see my kids safe if something were to happen.”

“I understand what pediatricians are saying, in terms of keeping your kids rear-facing as long as possible, but parents know their kids too and after age one if they are ready to turn around, then they are ready to turn around,” Taylor said.

If passed, the bill would not go into effect until the end of August.

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