Man sparks longest living internal kidney donor chain in Kansas - KCTV5 News

Man sparks longest living internal kidney donor chain in Kansas City

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An act of extreme kindness by one man sparked a chain of giving and receiving among ten people for a total of five kidney transplants over two days at The University of Kansas Health System. (University of Kansas Health System) An act of extreme kindness by one man sparked a chain of giving and receiving among ten people for a total of five kidney transplants over two days at The University of Kansas Health System. (University of Kansas Health System)
KANSAS CITY, KS (KCTV) -

An act of extreme kindness by one man sparked a chain of giving and receiving among ten people for a total of five kidney transplants over two days at The University of Kansas Health System.

It’s the longest living internal kidney donor transplant chain in the Kansas City area.

A total of ten surgeries took place Monday and Tuesday. It consisted of five surgeries to remove the living donor kidneys and five surgeries to implant the gift of life into waiting recipients. The donors and recipients were all doing well following their surgeries and continue to heal.

Although the surgeries were all performed at The University of Kansas Hospital in Kansas City, KS people in the chain came from Independence, Wichita, Manhattan and other hometowns not released out of respect of patients request for privacy. 

“These five patients were transplanted by the gift of five people willing to donate and helped by the hard work and contribution of nurses, coordinators, and operating room teams,” said Dr. Timothy Schmitt, director of transplantation at The University of Kansas Hospital. “It was an awesome two days.”

The chain began when a donor who was not a good match for his friend was willing to give his kidney to a stranger. His act of kindness inspired others wanting to help loved ones who also were a mismatch.

 “Kidney chains like this often begin with a single person willing to give their healthy kidney to someone in need,” said Jaime Bartley, organ transplant manager at The University of Kansas Hospital. “We realized we had a chain of potential donors and recipients. Everyone was eager to help when they realized the potential to save lives.” 

The structure of this ten-patient chain looked like this:

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