As Kansas City hits 121 homicides, city leaders discuss crime fi - KCTV5

As Kansas City hits 121 homicides, city leaders discuss crime fight

Posted: Updated:
Across the city, we’ve seen a large increase in violence.  On Thursday, Kansas City hit 121 homicides. Now, community members are sitting at the table to talk about where things stand and how to move forward. (KCTV5) Across the city, we’ve seen a large increase in violence. On Thursday, Kansas City hit 121 homicides. Now, community members are sitting at the table to talk about where things stand and how to move forward. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

Across the city, we’ve seen a large increase in violence.

Kansas City saw its 121st homicide of the year Thursday night when someone was shot and killed at 69th Terrace and Brooklyn.

Now, community members are sitting at the table to talk about where things stand and how to move forward.

They say in order to combat violence, everyone needs to focus on a solution. That means the city, the police department, as well as the community.

“Honestly, we've been preaching to the choir for decades. Those are not the kids that are causing the problems,” Forest Tyson Jr. said.

So what is the problem haunting Kansas City? As more young people turn to violence, where things sometimes turn deadly, community leaders say it’s a complex issue.

Pat Clarke and Forest Tyson Jr. are just two of the many faces involved in trying to get things turned around. Some of the solutions are practical -- buying vacant lots and turning around areas with blight.

"We're not trying to change the name, we're trying to change the look. You know, if you change the look, you can change the way people feel. If you can change the way people feel, you can change the way people act. If you can change the way people act, you can change a neighborhood, you can change a community,” Clarke said.

But others aren’t so simple. Both pointed to parenting as a major factor in the issue and say it all starts at home.

“Our kids today are being educated to think that selling dope or hustling or robbing and stealing is the way to get out, but you're hurting yourself, you're hurting your community,” Tyson said.

Another point both men brought up was the importance of resources that are in place getting support, both with finances and volunteers to make it work. They say it's not just about sports as far as those places go, but also programs that can help teach young people such as the W.E.B. DuBois Learning Center.

Copyright 2017 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
KCTV 5 News

Online Public File:
KCTV  KSMO

Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KCTV; Kansas City, MO. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.