23 years later: Kansas City, KS man gets hearing that may set hi - KCTV5

23 years later: Kansas City, KS man gets hearing that may set him free in double murder

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Lamonte McIntyre heads to court Thursday morning for a rare evidentiary hearing. (KCTV5) Lamonte McIntyre heads to court Thursday morning for a rare evidentiary hearing. (KCTV5)
He was convicted 23 years ago in a double murder that took place in broad daylight in a drug-infested Kansas City, KS neighborhood. (File) He was convicted 23 years ago in a double murder that took place in broad daylight in a drug-infested Kansas City, KS neighborhood. (File)
KANSAS CITY, KS (KCTV) -

Lamonte McIntyre heads to court Thursday morning for a rare evidentiary hearing.

He was convicted 23 years ago in a double murder that took place in broad daylight in a drug-infested Kansas City, KS neighborhood. He was 17 at the time of his conviction. Today, he is 41.

KCTV5 News' investigative team spoke to McIntrye from Lansing prison before he was transferred back to Wyandotte County.

“I don't have faith in the process. I don't have faith in the process at all. I have faith in the truth,” said McIntyre.

The truth according to the defense team is that McIntyre is innocent. He was convicted based on a botched investigation that uncovered allegations of police corruption and abuse.

“This was a slap dash investigation in fact I don't think the word investigation applies,” said lead defense attorney Cheryl Pilate.

McIntrye's hearing begins at 9 a.m. A rally will be held outside the Wyandotte County Courthouse at 8 a.m.

1994 investigation

A former Kansas City, KS Police Department detective reviewed the old case file and produced a brutal 18-page affidavit.

"…So little investigation was done, and the investigation that was conducted was done poorly or not according to generally accepted police practices," he writes.

The defense team points out the police line up used just five photos when they generally have six suspect photos. And three of the members were from one family.

“That was against everything I’ve been trained as a detective about having family members in a photo lineup I don’t get that. I don’t understand that,” said retired police detective turned private investigator Michael Bussell.

The defense team points a critical finger at the lead detective, Roger Golubski, saying he conducted 19.5 minutes of taped interviews and solved a double homicide in about six hours.

McIntyre’s defense team says their client wasn’t wearing the killer’s described outfit, there was no physical evidence linking their client to the crime and police failed to collect crucial evidence that could have provide his innocence. Additionally, McIntyre has an alibi. Plus, the whole case lacked any motive; they say McIntyre didn’t even know the victims.

The case rested on witnesses who now claim they were pressured and have recanted statements given to investigators.

One witness says she tried to stop the proceedings in 1994 when she realized McIntyre was much taller than the gunman.

New investigation

An innocence project decided to give the case a second look.

McIntyre has been back by Centurion Ministries out of Princeton, NJ and the Midwest Innocence Project in Kansas City, MO. The scope of their work spans seven years and cost more than half a million dollars in investigation and legal work.  

Much of the review was conducted by Bussell. He reconstructed the crime and interviewed witnesses and people who police missed in the original investigation.

“I don't even know how many I've talked to,” Bussell said.

Bussell says he declined to meet with McIntyre for years because he wanted to keep his investigation free from any pressure. He says he was just looking for the truth.

The legal brief filed in court is jaw-dropping. The defense team claims they have correctly solved the murders. The real killer has the street name “MONSTER.”

Affidavits show Neil Edgar knew the victims and allegedly confessed to people.

Edgar, also know as “MONSTER,” is in prison for a different murder. He never responded to KCTV5's requests for comment.

Bussell says he met McIntyre when his investigation ended and has finally formed an opinion.

“I really believe based on the evidence he didn't do that. I really believe that,” said Bussell.

Allegations of sex abuse and corruption

The lead detective who investigated the 1994 double murder is now retired. But he’s now in a harsh spotlight as accusers step forward saying he was sexually abuse and corrupt.

KCTV5 has done multiple reports on what women claim happened during Golubski’s time as a KCKPD detective.


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These accusers are expected to testify at McIntyre’s hearing. One alleged victim is McIntyre’s own mother. She questions if a vendetta by Golubski sent her son to prison.

The allegations are backed up by retired law enforcement including a former FBI agent who says he investigated Golubski but could not break the blue wall of silence.

A former KCKPD officer says Golubski’s behavior was known and tolerated because he was part of the “in crowd.”

Golubski declined to comment to KCTV5 about the mounting allegations. He is expected to testify at the upcoming hearing.

Calls for investigation

KCTV5 showed the affidavits and allegations to current Police Chief Terry Zeigler who directly worked with Golubski. he denies ever seeing or knowing anything troubling about Golubski.

The chief says he’s troubled by the allegations and that an independent investigation should take place into the allegations. You can watch the chief’s full interview here.

The FBI declined to comment either way if surfacing allegations will lead to a new investigation. A spokesperson cited McIntyre’s upcoming hearing but did say the department is well aware of Zeigler’s recent comments.

McIntyre’s hope

“I always said I was innocent but no one believed me,” said McIntyre in a recent prison phone call.

McIntyre says he feels blessed to have the support of innocence projects and views his current defense team as heaven sent.

“Faith is something that is real and is something that should be embraced because without it I don't think I’d make it through this situation. In your darkest moments, God will send someone to help you out,” said McIntyre

McIntyre currently works as a prison barber.

“I like to create my own thing. If someone wants a particular style like a mohawk or fade or whatever, I like to give me own rendition of that. I get creative with that if the person allows me to,” says McIntyre.

McIntyre says it’s a trade he hopes he’ll be able to practice if he’s released from prison.

His hearing is expected to last more than a week. It will be heard by a judge from another district. The judge has a wide range of legal options. It is unclear what the timetable will be for his ruling.

KCTV5’s investigative unit will be at the hearing daily and will provide updates on all of our platforms.

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