Kansas City first responders train for swift water rescues durin - KCTV5

Kansas City first responders train for swift water rescues during visit to Oceans of Fun

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The water rescue team comes to the water park once a year to train for potential deadly situations in rushing water. (KCTV5) The water rescue team comes to the water park once a year to train for potential deadly situations in rushing water. (KCTV5)
The real-life waters can be navigated safely allowing first-responders to practice new techniques. (KCTV5) The real-life waters can be navigated safely allowing first-responders to practice new techniques. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

The Kansas City Fire Department and Kansas City Police Departments spent their Tuesday at Oceans of Fun.

But their time on the rides, such as The Fury of the Nile, was much different than what many are used to.

The water rescue team comes to the water park once a year to train for potential deadly situations in rushing water. In 2017, though it carries an extra importance with the recent hurricanes hitting many southern states, Kansas City has seen its own historic flooding and water damage.

KCFD Water Rescue Battalion Chief Larry Young says Tuesday’s training is what helps them save lives.

Crews have put their work into practice, during the recent flooding in Houston after Hurricane Harvey and in the metro, in areas near 103rd Street and Wornall Road.

A restaurant in the area, Coach’s Bar & Grill, was the scene of a recent water rescue, as its owners had to be lifted through a hole in the roof as floodwaters filled the building.

“We’re going to do some boat stuff later on, which is one of the things we thought about utilizing down at Coach’s,” Young said.

Young says working at the theme park is invaluable for his teams.

“It’s invaluable because it’s a controlled environment,” Young said.

The real-life waters can be navigated safely allowing first-responders to practice new techniques.

But crews know it won’t always be so easy.

“We don’t have to deal with the debris and we don’t have the emergency stop button that we have here, that doesn’t exist in the real world,” Young said.

In 2017, the crew is made up of 12 new water rescue members and 15 refreshers working from day until night, in the rushing waters, to keep people safe, when disaster strikes.

The Kansas City Fire Department and Kansas City Police Department water rescue teams will continue training into next week. When they have completed their training, first responders from Overland Park will begin their theme park training.

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