Gas prices in Kansas City area see spike after Hurricane Harvey - KCTV5

Gas prices in Kansas City area see spike after Hurricane Harvey

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Hurricane driven price spikes don't tend to last long but will affect drivers in the Kansas City area. (AP) Hurricane driven price spikes don't tend to last long but will affect drivers in the Kansas City area. (AP)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

Hurricane Harvey could send gas prices soaring by as much as 25 cents.

The storm has already knocked out 22-percent of the Gulf of Mexico's oil-refinery capacity.

Hurricane driven price spikes don't tend to last long but will affect drivers in the Kansas City area.

The most expensive fuel is in North Kansas City, MO. Gas is $2.49 a gallon at the Quick Fuel near Iron Street and 12th Avenue.

To find the cheapest gas, drivers need to head to Leavenworth, KS. There, drivers will pay $2 a gallon at the Murphy USA on Eisenhower Road.

Chris Lambie of Garnder, KS, says he’s lucky.

"I get 40 miles a gallon but I have friends that drive trucks and ask me for gas,” Lambie said.

Lambie says the rising prices are a real concern.

Gas prices were rising before Harvey hit.

Missouri prices have risen 8 cents in the past month. Kansas prices are UP 6 cents.

“Just learning that gas is going to go up, I will probably be going to call a couple of my friends and tell them that,” Lambie added.

Throughout the country, a gallon of gas will cost between five and 15 cents more, according to Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for the Oil Price Information Service. 

On average across the country, gas currently costs $2.25 per gallon, according to AAA.

Incessant rain from Harvey, which slammed ashore as a strong hurricane late last week, has submerged much of Houston and shut down Texas's oil and gas industry. It's unclear how bad the damage to facilities along the state's Gulf Coast but preliminary signs indicate widespread losses, which will have big implications for the U.S. economy and oil and gas prices.

Gasoline futures spiked in trading. S&P Global analysts said about 2.2 million barrels per day of refining capacity were down or being brought down by Sunday.

In the aftermath of previous storms -- such as Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Ike and Isaac -- gasoline prices peaked within two weeks after landfall at a level of 20 cents to 80 cents per gallon higher, according to PIRA Energy, an analytics unit of S&P Global Platts.

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