Swift actions save 7-year-old stroke victim - KCTV5

Swift actions save 7-year-old stroke victim

Posted: Updated:
Mason Payne suffered a stroke that doctors say could have taken his life if it wasn't for the swiftness of both his parents and the medical staff involved. (KCTV5) Mason Payne suffered a stroke that doctors say could have taken his life if it wasn't for the swiftness of both his parents and the medical staff involved. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

According to doctors, kids don't usually have strokes.

But for 7-year-old Mason Payne, he suffered one that doctors say could have taken his life if it wasn't for the swiftness of both his parents and the medical staff involved. 

Mother Amy Fair and boyfriend Josh Turpin were home with Mason when they noticed him slowly losing control of his own body.

Terrified and unsure what was happening, they drove him to Children’s Mercy Hospital where they met up with his dad.

“He just couldn’t talk. You could see the fear in his eyes. You can tell he wanted to say something. He’d open his mouth, but no words would come out,” said step-dad, Josh Turpin. “It was the most fearful thing I’ve ever dealt with in my entire life.”

Doctors quickly determined the 7-year-old was having a stroke in a critical area of his brain. A blood clot was present in his basilar artery.

“The basilar artery is the main artery that is supplying your brain stem. The brain stem is essentially your command center – it keeps you breathing, it keeps your heart beating,” said Children’s Mercy Hospital pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Roha Khalid.

The outcome of Mason’s life was racing against the clock.

“I said what happens next, where do we go from here,” Amy Fair said. “He (the doctor) said, all I can tell you is that I’m very concerned and you have to go now.”

Doctors in Children’s Mercy Pediatric Stroke Unit had Mason rushed to the University of Kansas Health System.

“Every moment that clock is ticking, you’re losing brain cells once that stroke starts,” Khalid said.

Doctors worked on Mason, using tools they’d typically only use on adults.  

“We took a very flexible catheter that’s designed for this to the level of obstruction and connected it to a mechanical pump that essentially applied suction to the area of obstruction,” said University of Kansas Health System endovascular surgeon Dr. Koji Ebersole. “So like a vacuum cleaner, it sucked it out into the hose. As soon as it sucked out, blood flow was restored.”

Doctors said Mason’s stroke was a freak accident, and the likelihood of it happening again would be like getting struck by lightning.

“The injury to the brain can be irreversible. Fortunately, it has proved to be remarkably reversible for him and our expectations he can go onto a full life with minimal changes as a consequence of this could have been life threatening problem,” said Ebersole.

“We thought that we’d be making much different arrangements,” said Mason’s dad, Ray Payne. “The doctors said in order for Mason to turn out the way he did, the moon and the sun would have to line up together for all of this to be right. It just so happened to of been 99 years since the last eclipse. That to me is just not a coincidence.”

Children’s Mercy Pediatric Stroke Unit and the University of Kansas Health System work in partnership.

According to Khalid, Children’s Mercy is able to identify whether or not a child is experiencing a stroke. The University of Kansas Health System can then use their tools to work on the patient.

“Right now we’re the only pediatric stroke center in the Kansas City metro area. We have the ability to have a pediatric neurologist at bed side for a stroke evaluation within minutes. We also have the capability to do a sedated MRI 24/7 if needed,” said Khalid.

Mason will be celebrating his eighth birthday Thursday, which is also the day he is being released from the hospital. He said all he wants for his birthday is to go home. 

Copyright 2017 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
KCTV 5 News

Online Public File:
KCTV  KSMO

Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KCTV; Kansas City, MO. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.