Kansas City Library joins metro parents to battle the "summer sl - KCTV5

Kansas City Library joins metro parents to battle the "summer slide"

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Hollander said the key is to make sure the children know that learning doesn’t just happen in the classroom. (KCTV5) Hollander said the key is to make sure the children know that learning doesn’t just happen in the classroom. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

With summer halfway over, experts are warning of the “summer slide” and the impact it can have on a child. If you notice your children are glued to the couch and their brains are glued to the TV, it’s time to act fast.

The summer reading program at the Kansas City Library isn’t your typical learning setting. It’s about more than just words on paper. It’s about movement, rhythm, and most importantly fun.

“I think what’s really important is making it fun. Don’t make it a chore. Even if it’s just 20 minutes a day; magazines, cereal boxes, signs on the highway…make It fun,” said Claire Hollander.

Hollander has been reading to kids at the Library for years.

For parent’s the summer slide is a reality. “I think that’s a real thing where they get kind of summer brain, where they forget a lot of things. So we make sure they’re doing a little,” said Becca Talken.

Talken and Lisa Blake bring their children to the library to keep their minds molding during the break. The library said reading the equivalent of 4-5 books, in any form over the summer, will keep your child’s brain sharp.

“We do the summer reading program at out library! I like earning books,” Blake’s son said.

The reward of a book, video game, or even allowance is a tool that experts say works.

“I’m a teacher so I understand the rigorous took it takes on them,” Talken said.

Statistics from the Oxford Learning Center say the -month break is a slippery slope”

  • 2.5 months of math skills are lost over the summer for all students
  • 2 months of reading skills are lost primarily among lower-income children

According to a National Summer Learning Association Study of 500 teachers:

  • 66% spend the first month of school re-teaching students
  • 24% spend the first month and a half re-teaching

Hollander said the key is to make sure the children know that learning doesn’t just happen in the classroom. “So the children start to learn that life is about learning. Not 9:10 am to 9:40 am when the bell rings.”

If you have a teen, she suggests tech free times of the day and also having them read to their younger siblings.

The summer reading program is free and continues through July.

More information about the program can be found here.

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