Predatory sex offender sentenced to life in Platte County - KCTV5

Predatory sex offender sentenced to life in Platte County

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Shannon Langley, 35, received the sentence Thursday after pleading guilty that same day in Platte County Circuit Court to first-degree statutory sodomy and enticement of a child. (Jackson County Jail) Shannon Langley, 35, received the sentence Thursday after pleading guilty that same day in Platte County Circuit Court to first-degree statutory sodomy and enticement of a child. (Jackson County Jail)
PLATTE COUNTY, MO (KCTV) -

A man has been sentenced to life in prison for sexually abusing a 10-year-old girl.

Shannon Langley, 35, received the sentence Thursday after pleading guilty that same day in Platte County Circuit Court to first-degree statutory sodomy and enticement of a child.

In addition to the victim in Platte County, prosecutors also showed that Langley had abused several other children in Jackson County.

Prosecutors used those other criminal acts to charge Langley as a predatory sexual offender under Missouri law. The seldom-used provision requires a life sentence for offenders who commit multiple serious sexual offenses.

“We used every tool the law gives us make sure that this defendant has molested his last child.  His days of hurting kids are finally over," Platte County Prosecuting Attorney Eric Zahnd said.

Langley was babysitting the victim when the offenses occurred. He admitted to trying to kiss the 10-year-old girl. He then told her he need to “check her for bugs” and touched her genitals.

The victim sent a message to her mother via Facebook that led the mother to believe something was wrong. The mother immediately came home, and the victim told her about the abuse.

Langley has two pending cases in Jackson County. In one, he is charged with sexual misconduct involving a child. In the second, he is charged with three counts of statutory sodomy in the first degree.

Platte County prosecutors used the facts of those cases to secure the life sentence.

Zahnd credited a 2014 law change for helping bring Langley to justice. Since 2014, prosecutors have been allowed to tell judges and juries about prior criminal acts in child sex cases. 

“We secured these convictions without requiring the victim testifying at trial because the defendant knew the jury would hear about all the other children we allege he had abused. We fought to change the law so that sexually abused children do not have to stand alone. The new law works as intended," Zahnd said.

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