Thousands in Kansas City still lack power two days after storms - KCTV5

Thousands in Kansas City still lack power two days after storms

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Officials say the storms caused about $1 million worth of damage. (KCTV5) Officials say the storms caused about $1 million worth of damage. (KCTV5)
The Ray County Public Library will also be closed on Monday due to the weekend storms. (Facebook/Ray County Public Library) The Ray County Public Library will also be closed on Monday due to the weekend storms. (Facebook/Ray County Public Library)
The roof of the building was damaged in the storm, allowing water into the building. (Facebook/Ray County Public Library) The roof of the building was damaged in the storm, allowing water into the building. (Facebook/Ray County Public Library)
Several reports of power lines and trees down were reported throughout the metro on Saturday night. (KCTV5) Several reports of power lines and trees down were reported throughout the metro on Saturday night. (KCTV5)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

Thousands woke up without power Monday morning and officials say they could stay in the dark until at least the evening.

This comes after power lines and trees down were reported down throughout the metro Saturday night.

As of 12 p.m. Monday, 9,574 Kansas City residents were without power.

"The restoration for storm events of this type (with two back-to-back storms, severe tree and pole damage) typically can take several days to complete. We have all of our crews, plus crews from four other states working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power to those affected," a Kansas City Power and Light spokesperson told KCTV5 Monday morning.

Over 30,000 KCP&L customers were without power as of early Sunday evening, while about 2,900 remained without power in Wyandotte County according to BPU. 

KCP&L said that over 95,000 were without power at one point following the round of storms.

Officials say the outages stretch from Overland Park, KS to 39th Street in Kansas City, MO to Raytown.

Many people say older trees are to blame for several of the outages. They say the branches break easily and bring down power lines.

KCP&L officials say they’ve been working around the clock trying to get the lights back on, but the damage is extensive.

“Our territory goes from Iowa to Springfield to Kansas to Boonville. We've had damage through almost three-quarters of that territory. It was pretty widespread from our perspective,” said Chris Kurtz, senior director of operations for KCP&L.

Kurtz says crews have been working through the night, since Friday, to restore power.

Sixty-five power poles had to be replaced after the first round of storms. Officials are still assessing how many will need to be replaced after the second round hit on Saturday.

Crews have been working to restore power and say some people will have to wait until at least Monday evening before the power in their home is turned back on.

KCP&L has called in crews from surrounding states to assist in the clean-up.

"So what we do is utilities in U.S. have mutual assistance process. We call for help. We brought in lineman from Oklahoma, Colorado, still coming from Minnesota and Indiana," Kurtz.

Kurtz says Joplin, MO and Westar Engergy have also sent crews to help with the damage.

Officials say the storms caused about $1 million worth of damage.

"There is no good way to know that, but its millions of dollars, not thousands," Kurtz said. "This is a multi-million dollar storm."

Officials say the recovery effort will take, "a few more days." Those without power are hoping for sooner, rather than later.

On Monday, residents came to check on their neighbors and pick up branches that had fallen.

Some people said they had to throw out large amounts of food, while others chose to stay up late to grill everything in an effort to not waste it.

Jeff Stirling has been without power since Friday. He says his next door neighbor’s power came on for a short time Sunday evening and he was able to run a power cord from their home to his so they could have some electricity.

Stirling says his partner’s mother is on hospice and they need power. He says the last few days have been rough but they’re trying to look on the bright side.

“The weather, we’ve been lucky the last couple days it’s been nicer out, and it’s going to get hot again, and having an elderly lady here, that’s not good. It's just been a bad situation,” Stirling said.

Storm damage has caused closures at some establishments throughout the metro.

Old Mission United Methodist Church canceled its summer preschool on Monday as the church says the storms knocked out the building’s power and air conditioning unit.

“We have no air-conditioning or lighting in most of the building. It is 90 degrees in the building and will cool some overnight but without lighting and alarms it will still be unsafe to occupy in the morning,” a statement from the church’s website said.

Sunday services were also canceled at the church.

The Ray County Public Library will also be closed on Monday due to the weekend storms.

The roof of the building was damaged in the storm, allowing water into the building.

Library officials say the storm caused heavy damage to the interior and exterior of the building.

The library says the clean-up will be a long process. They say a tarp has been put over the hole in the roof, the power has been restored, the phones are working, the humidity is down to 50 percent and all of the damaged areas are under control.

A restoration company will be assisting in the clean-up.

The library will be closed until further notice.

Previous coverage: Hours after storms move out, nearly 14K remain without power in the metro

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