CDC alerts parents about potential for faulty lead tests - KCTV5

CDC alerts parents about potential for faulty lead tests

Posted: Updated:
By the age of one, doctors say every baby should get a blood test, monitoring lead levels via a finger prick or a heel stick. (AP) By the age of one, doctors say every baby should get a blood test, monitoring lead levels via a finger prick or a heel stick. (AP)
FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) -

The Center for Disease Control has released an alarming national alert about the lead testing parents do for their children.

They say the tests might not be accurate. And they may not have been accurate for years. 

Lead can be found in so many places, including paints, playground surfaces and pipes; which is why doctors say it is so important to test babies and children for elevated lead levels. It could affect their brain development. 

But it turns out, one of the standard methods of testing may have been reporting inaccurate levels for a very long time.

By the age of one, doctors say every baby should get a blood test, monitoring lead levels via a finger prick or a heel stick.

If that test result comes back high, doctors test the baby a second time. This time, with a blood-draw at a lab.

The results from the blood draw are the results in question. 

“Some of the lab and tools and techniques used have been artificially giving lower levels than expected for those Venus draws,” said Doctor Natasha Burgert of Pediatric Associates.

Kansas City-based Pediatrician, Dr. Natasha Burgert says she's warning all families who've ever had a baby get tested for lead in a lab, with a draw, to get re-tested. 

“It could be significant,” Burgert said. “And they said that it could be happening for years. So, we don't know exactly how long this problem has existed and we don't know specifically how off the test is. But, when you get a national CDC alert, you pay attention.”

Doctors say the alert means parents or caregivers with a child that ever got a blood draw at a lab to test for lead levels, need to call the pediatrician or family doctor to see if their child needs to be re-tested.

The alert also applies to women who are pregnant or nursing.

Copyright 2017 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
KCTV 5 News

Online Public File:
KCTV  KSMO

Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KCTV; Kansas City, MO. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.