Students can make applying to college more affordable using thes - KCTV5

Students can make applying to college more affordable using these tips

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This week is graduation for many local high school seniors, and that means juniors now begin the process of applying to college which can be expensive. (KCTV5) This week is graduation for many local high school seniors, and that means juniors now begin the process of applying to college which can be expensive. (KCTV5)
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

This week is graduation for many local high school seniors, and that means juniors now begin the process of applying to college which can be expensive.

A new study shows colleges and universities, collectively, make $200 million on rejected applications.

The worst offenders are California schools:

  1. University of California-Los Angeles: $5,369,840
  2. University of California-Berkeley: $4,681,320
  3. Stanford University: $3,632,130
  4. University of California-San Diego: $3,608,290
  5. University of Southern California $1,827,075

KCTV5 News combed the list of local schools, and nothing jumped out except for Washington University at $1.8 million.

Emma Evans is a senior at Winnetonka High School. She’s looking ahead to the future and college and admits finding the right school can be tough.

"It was definitely overwhelming at first because there are so many schools in the country," she said.

Evans eventually applied to eight schools - five in-state schools where she was pretty sure she would be accepted and then three “stretch” schools where she’d love to go. Her counselor helped.

"Narrow down what schools do you truly see yourself at, so that you are applying to schools that are realistic and where they see themselves successful," high school counselor Jennifer Ford said.

Ford recommends students visit any college before they pay any application fee and to keep applications realistic. The "Hail Mary" approach of applying to numerous top universities that aren’t really a match will only cost money and won’t really increase your shot at an Ivy League education.

"I usually encourage students to apply to five schools, but it depends on the student," Ford said.

Evans didn’t pay a dime when applying. She found waivers.

"We work really hard to help kids or students find schools with a free application process or look for a way to get a waiver and not pay that application fee," Ford said.

Ford points out sometimes if a student doesn’t qualify for a waiver, a counselor can ask and many colleges and universities will waive the fee.

Evans is headed to Northwestern University.

"I was admitted in the journalism school there, so really excited," she said.

Evans graduated Thursday evening.

College advisers say when it comes to applications is start early. Which means juniors who will be seniors next year need to start thinking about where they will apply, visit those campuses and then narrow down their choices.

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