Shawnee homeowners hope to silence train horns in neighborhood - KCTV5

Shawnee homeowners hope to silence train horns in neighborhood

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Every day, people in a Shawnee neighborhood hear train horns blaring dozens of times a day. The problem is two small railroad crossings on Martindale Road at 73rd and 75th streets. (KCTV5) Every day, people in a Shawnee neighborhood hear train horns blaring dozens of times a day. The problem is two small railroad crossings on Martindale Road at 73rd and 75th streets. (KCTV5)
SHAWNEE, KS (KCTV) -

Every day, people in a Shawnee neighborhood hear train horns blaring dozens of times a day.

The problem is two small railroad crossings on Martindale Road at 73rd and 75th streets. Trains have to sound their horns at those crossings. One time is bad enough, but imagine hearing the horns blaring 89 times a day.

"It can definitely bother you at times, definitely. It's hard to have people over. It's hard to really talk to people even when you're inside," Jenna Gilliland said.

Shawnee resident Chuck Payne agrees.

"Yeah, it's kind of a pain in the neck, because they are kind of loud at times. And some of those guys kind of abuse the horn some, but they've got federal laws they've have to follow.  And I imagine if people work nights, it probably bothers them more than anything," he said.

Now, there's a solution thanks to the city's public works department.

"We're going to silence those horns by either closing crossings or by creating quiet zones. So, what everybody traditionally sees at a crossing, the lights and gates and medians, we're going to be installing some of those," said Caitlin Gard, assistant to the Shawnee public works director.

Residents near the tracks are helping to make it happen. They passed the hat, chipping in $44,000 along with the cooperation of homeowner David Hoene.

"In order to close on of the crossings, we do need to build a bridge across this Mill Creek which goes right across Mr. Hoene's property. And that's what that $44,000 that the residents have raised is going to go towards," Gard said.

As for Gilliland, she says it is going going to improve life for her.

"It's going to be nice, because I can talk to people on the phone, and they don't hear the trains, so, it's definitely going to improve life, a lot," she said.

The city hopes to start construction on the new crossings in the beginning of the year and finish by the end of 2017. 

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