New technology helps legally blind Independence boy see - KCTV5

New technology helps legally blind Independence boy see

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An Independence family is working to raise money so they can get new technology that will help a legally blind boy see. (Jennie Braden) An Independence family is working to raise money so they can get new technology that will help a legally blind boy see. (Jennie Braden)
INDEPENDENCE, MO (KCTV) -

An Independence family is working to raise money so they can get new technology that will help a legally blind boy see.

Corbin Wolfe has been through a lot in his seven years of life. He was a mini preemie, born weighing 1 pound, 14 ounces. He’s had 86 surgeries.

“He’s a miracle,” his mom, Jennie Braden, said.

Braden found eSight while researching online. The company came to Kansas City to do a demo, and the results stunned her.

“I had so many emotions going on inside of me because they said they didn’t know if they would work or not," she said.

Clearly, they did. Cellphone video shows Corbin’s excitement.

“Oh my gosh! I love these!” he said.

Taylor West is the vice president of Outreach at eSight, a startup company based in Toronto. He told KCTV5 eSight works for roughly 75 percent of people with low vision.

The eSight eyewear has a camera mounted on the bridge of the nose. It captures video and processes it through a computer. It can be manipulated to allow people who are legally blind to see.

“They get back a lot of detail they wouldn’t have had. Kids like Corbin who get eSight feel more included in the classroom,” said West. “They can see they board better; they can see their friends better.”

Corbin’s first-grade teacher, Johnalyn Sapp, said she cried when she saw the video of Corbin using eSight. She said he’s bright and a leader in the classroom, and she doesn’t want to see Corbin’s disability hold him back.

“If he was able to get these glasses, it would be another tool to help him in his learning," she said.

The problem, however, is the cutting-edge technology costs $15,000. West recognizes this can be a barrier for people who need it.

“Our goal isn’t just to make the technology; it’s to actually have people use the technology and change lives,” said West.

eSight is working to help Corbin’s family raise the money so he can get his own pair of eSight glasses. If you’d like to help, click here.

Corbin and his mom can’t get that day, when he could finally see clearly, out of their minds.

“It was my best day of my whole entire life,” said Corbin.

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