Doctor, patient agree that early detection key in battling breas - KCTV5

Doctor, patient agree that early detection key in battling breast cancer

Posted: Updated:
Missy Wolfe and Dr. Ann Kobberman will always be tight, after all, they've been to battle together, and won. (KCTV5) Missy Wolfe and Dr. Ann Kobberman will always be tight, after all, they've been to battle together, and won. (KCTV5)
OVERLAND PARK, KS (KCTV) -

October is national breast cancer awareness month. 

The disease is still the second-leading cause of women’s cancer deaths.

KCTV5 spoke with a survivor and her doctor who can't stress enough the importance of early detection.

Missy Wolfe and Dr. Ann Kobberman will always be tight, after all, they've been to battle together, and won.

Wolfe had already been through multiple breast biopsies in the past, so when she felt a change in the summer of 2014 she thought it might just be scar tissue from all those operations.

"Just through a monthly self-exam, I noticed I had some changes and at first I thought I'll wait till my next mammogram but then something told me I need to go and check it out," Wolfe said.

It was a good thing she did.

"I was on my way to a beach vacation when I got the call from doctor Kobberman that it was cancer," she said.

Fortunately, it was in its early stages.

Wolfe says because of her past with biopsies she knew she was at higher risk, so it wasn't a huge surprise.

In fact, she says it was almost a relief because now she could do something about it.

Wolfe went through treatment at the Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute at Overland Park Regional Medical Center.

She elected to have a double mastectomy and also went through several rounds of chemotherapy.

"Screening is so important,” doctor Kobberman said. “The earlier we can identify at earlier stages, the better chance to become a survivor."

Doctor Kobbermann says treatment for breast cancer is becoming more advanced all the time.

"We can limit how much treatment people need in terms of chemotherapy and other things if we can identify their cancer in earlier stages so they don't get as difficult treatment so their course is better and then their outcomes are better with side effects and such," she said.

Doctor Kobbermann wants to remind women to get yearly mammograms after age 40.

Every woman should have clinical breast exams with a doctor or nurse beginning at age 30.

Women at high risk should have yearly mammograms along with an MRI beginning at age 30 and start doing self-exams in your 20's.

"If you find something that's subtly different don't wait even if your next mam a couple months off. Make a call to explore that and find out what it is," doctor Kobbermann said.

For Wolfe, following her instincts saved her life and now she says she feels healthier than ever.

"I think it gives you a new perspective on what's important and it kind of gives you that reset button," Wolfe said.

Copyright 2016 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
KCTV 5 News

Online Public File:
KCTV  KSMO

Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KCTV; Kansas City, MO. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.