Woman details breakup turned to extreme stalking - KCTV5 News

Woman details breakup turned to extreme stalking

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When Ashley Kovatchev first met her ex-boyfriend, the connection was immediate.  “It was so great,” Kovatchev told KCTV5's Angie Ricono. “My third date was Israel.” When Ashley Kovatchev first met her ex-boyfriend, the connection was immediate. “It was so great,” Kovatchev told KCTV5's Angie Ricono. “My third date was Israel.”
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

When Ashley Kovatchev first met her ex-boyfriend, the connection was immediate.

“It was so great,” Kovatchev told KCTV5's Angie Ricono. “My third date was Israel.” 

The two traveled the world, chatted on the phone constantly while exchanging texts and emails.

The fairytale romance all came crashing down when Kovatchev said she discovered he was married and had another girlfriend. She ended the relationship.

"A light switch went off and my life has turned upside down," she said.

It’s estimated one in six women have been stalked at one point. According to the Stalking Resource Center, two thirds of stalkers pursue their victims at least once a week. Kovatchev reached out to KCTV5 to share her story because she wants others to know that they are not alone.

When the relationship ended, she started receiving bizarre phone calls, emails and text messages, including a call where a man on the other line said, “I’ve been asked to keep an eye on you.”

She started documenting everything and filing police reports.

Her ex-boyfriend was arrested and charged with stalking. He spent 10 days in New York's Riker’s Island and pleaded guilty to violating a protection order. The judge granted Kovatchev a lifetime protection order.

She said since that day her life has gotten worse.

When all this started, Kovatchev was one of the top insurance agents in the country, writing policies for major hotels. She loved her job.

“This was the world I created for myself. It was the reason I woke up,” she recalled.

An email was blasted to all of her clients, claiming that she was being investigated for fraud, which wasn’t true.

“It actually forged the department of insurance name and it looked legit, but it came from a Gmail account," she explained.

She said the ensuing commotion crumbled her business.

Another letter went out. This time it was sent to all her personal contacts, detailing very private personal information and making wild claims. It said

Kovatchev practiced black magic and suffered from mental illness.

Kovatchev went on the offensive. She filed more police reports and what she learned shocked and disappointed her.

Kathy Ray with the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence said cyber stalking is tough to prove. Tech-savvy stalkers quickly learn how to cover their tracks.

“Going back and tracking records and IP addresses is very difficult for law enforcement,” Ray said.

Kovatchev continues to be aggressive in collecting evidence. She saves every email, friend request and any suspicious activity that comes her way online. It has actually backfired for her. She’s been accused of harassing her ex-boyfriend. He filed for a protection order in New York but withdrew the request.

She is now pushing for more legal action against him but, at this point, prosecutors say there is nothing else they can do.

KCTV5 reached out to Kovatchev's ex-boyfriend, but he has not responded to voicemails or emails.

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