Students learn forensic science through KCPD crime lab - KCTV5

Students learn forensic science through KCPD crime lab

Posted: Updated:
"We put a lot of different things in there to spur them to think about what a crime scene investigator has to think about when they're at a scene," crime lab director Linda Netzel said. "We put a lot of different things in there to spur them to think about what a crime scene investigator has to think about when they're at a scene," crime lab director Linda Netzel said.
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

Imagine being given the task of solving a crime at the age of 17. That's the job a handful of Kansas City school students were given.

It's all part of a new hands-on approach to learning that school officials hope will help students interested in math and science based careers.

About 30 students from Lincoln College Preparatory Academy were bused over to the Kansas City Police Department's crime lab on Troost Avenue.

Outside, they found a large tent set up, and when they walked inside, they found a scene many say they would only seen on TV.

"We put a lot of different things in there to spur them to think about what a crime scene investigator has to think about when they're at a scene," crime lab director Linda Netzel said.

Those things included bullets, shell casings and even real blood spatter. It was all part of a mock crime scene that the students had to solve.

"Employers now are looking for kids who have experience with hands on opportunities. It saves them with job training, and kids know exactly what they're going into and it helps them make decisions as to where they want to go," said Steve Evans, an assistant principal at Lincoln College Prep.

The new six-week course for students at Lincoln College Prep and Central Academy of Excellence is for those interested in a science-based career.

Organizers say it's a fun way for students to learn, without them even knowing it.

"I think a lot of people should look at it because even though it has a lot of math and science, when you're doing it, it doesn't really feel like math and science," student Calise Graves said.

About 80 students wanted to take the course, but they had to limit the number to 60. Because of the popularity, they hope to continue the course next year with even more spots.

Copyright 2015 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
KCTV 5 News

Online Public File:
KCTV  KSMO

Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KCTV; Kansas City, MO. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.