Study: Gender linked to type of traffic crash - KCTV5

Study: Gender linked to type of traffic crash

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A new Kansas State University study finds gender affects the likelihood of young drivers being involved in different types of crashes. A new Kansas State University study finds gender affects the likelihood of young drivers being involved in different types of crashes.
MANHATTAN, KS (KCTV/AP) -

A new Kansas State University study finds gender affects the likelihood of young drivers being involved in different types of crashes.

For the study, a civil engineering professor and doctoral student looked at five years of Kansas accidents involving 16- to 24-year-old drivers.

Their findings include that young female drivers had more crashes at intersections and collisions with pedestrians. They also found that young male drivers had more off-road crashes and accidents at sunset. They are also more likely to crash on the highway and on a weekend.

The researchers said they hoped the study would be used to help develop more targeted educational materials.

The findings were published in the Journal of Safety Research. The research is part of a larger Kansas Department of Transportation study about improving highway safety of young drivers.

Joe Harder, who operates Harder Performance Driver Education, said instructing boys is different than instructing girls.

"Boys are much more aggressive. They like to get in and mash on the gas pedal," he said. "Ladies are a little more reserved. They like to take their time, sometimes they take too much time."

The results don't surprise some teen drivers.

Jeff Barnhill, 18, said males "have more testosterone and are more careless than women."

Heather Miller, 18, said females can make poor choices, which she said explains the wrecks at intersections.

"They're careless and are doing their makeup or something at a red light," she said.

Young women are more likely to wear their seatbelts but also to drive on a restricted license. Some believe young men are more likely to drive on the weekends.

"Men are more excited on the weekends. They have things to do," Barnhill said.

Harder said the study highlights the importance of driver's education.

"To get safer young kids on the street you need a smarter driver, and that involves schooling," Harder said.

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