Charity scam claims to help Kansas City cancer patients - KCTV5

Charity scam claims to help Kansas City cancer patients

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"It's a fraud in my son's name. They are smearing my son's memory," said Robin Dunlap. "What they are doing is not right." "It's a fraud in my son's name. They are smearing my son's memory," said Robin Dunlap. "What they are doing is not right."
KCTV5 joined the investigation after learning that the Keeon Fight for Cancer Foundation was formed by a Kansas City woman named Karen Fowler. KCTV5 joined the investigation after learning that the Keeon Fight for Cancer Foundation was formed by a Kansas City woman named Karen Fowler.
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

A charity operating in the metro claims to help cancer patients and their families with medical and personal expenses but state records show they should not be in business.

"It's a fraud in my son's name. They are smearing my son's memory," said Robin Dunlap. "What they are doing is not right."

Dunlap contacted KCTV5 News' sister-station, KMOV-TV, in St. Louis when she discovered the Keeon Fight for Cancer Foundation was set up in her late son's name.

She said Keeon died back in 2008 but it was not from cancer.

"He was a Jerry's kid, Jerry's kids are muscular dystrophy, that's when I knew something was wrong," Dunlap said.

There were numerous postings on several event calendars that promoted a late July event at a Kansas City amusement park for a "fun in the sun" day to benefit the foundation.

One of those sites allowed people to purchase tickets and pay through electronic payment online. The event promised an all-you-can-eat buffet option, a kid's talent show and access to the amusement park.

KCTV5 joined the investigation after learning that the Keeon Fight for Cancer Foundation was formed by a Kansas City woman named Karen Fowler.

The cancer foundation filed their paperwork to incorporate as a nonprofit with the Missouri Secretary of State's Office in 2012. But other records show that the state administratively dissolved or revoked the nonprofit for "failing to file a correct and current annual report."

Executive Deputy Secretary of State Barbara J. Wood wrote Folwer a letter on December 18, 2013, that stated, "A corporation administratively dissolved may not carry on any business except that necessary to windup and liquidate its business and affairs."

KCTV5 investigative reporter Eric Chaloux texted Fowler to discuss the charity's event that was advertised to happen the next day while our undercover camera was out of sight.

"Yeah, so far it's been people calling for information," said Fowler about the event she was promoting for the charity.

KCTV5 found online this is not the first time the foundation has tried to get donations.

Online records show tickets were for sale for a September 21, 2013 event called the "Keoon Foundation Home Charity Giveaway."

The name of the foundation in the advertisement was misspelled. The actual name of her cousin is spelled "Keeon." Tickets were advertised at $100 apiece to get a chance to win a house in the giveaway.

"I gave away 20 last year," said Fowler.

Chaloux questioned her, "20 houses?"

Folwer replied, "Yeah, so I'm going to try and reach my goal of 100 this year."

Fowler touted her charitable donations from the foundation to other groups.

"I give the money to like Children's Mercy. They are building a cancer research center," said Fowler. "So I donated a $100,000 to them last year."

An official with Children's Mercy Hospitals told KCTV5 News they have never accepted a gift from the foundation nor have they received any gift larger than $50 from anyone named Karen Fowler.

When a KCTV5 photographer walked down the block, where Fowler could see the camera pointed right at her, the philanthropic tale went bust.

"You are out there saying your loved one died of cancer ... but his family is saying that's not the case. Are you trying to pocket off people's sympathy," questioned Chaloux.

"No, what am I pocketing off people's sympathy?" said Fowler.

Chaloux replied, "Just a minute ago you were making money helping people ... donating left and right."

"No I didn't," said Folwer.

"Then when the camera came out Karen ... you're telling a whole different story," said Chaloux. 

"No ... and can you turn that off?" said Fowler as she pushed our camera out of the away.

For Keeon's mother, she just doesn't want his name associated with this "questionable charity."

"I don't think they are helping nobody. I think they are spending the money, just raising money and living off it," said Dunlap.

KCTV5 can't find any public record to show that the foundation has raised any money.

After saying she had raised money, Fowler changed her story when the camera came out and she claims to have not raised any money.

Folwer took Keeon's name off the charity. Her new foundation is M and M Fight for Terminal Illnesses Foundation.

KCTV5 could not find any state records to confirm it has been "officially" formed as a nonprofit.

To check out any charity before you donate, click on this link from the Better Business Bureau.

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