Football Helmets with Unequal Predict a Significantly Lower Risk of Concussions - KCTV5

Football Helmets with Unequal Predict a Significantly Lower Risk of Concussions

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SOURCE Dr. Chad Stephens

Team physician's report aggregates data from multiple sources and the numbers tell a dramatic story

ARGYLE, Texas, May 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Chad Stephens, D.O., released today an independent report which examines the medical opinion of leading neurosurgeons that 'helmets with Unequal® predict a significantly lower risk of concussions.'  Analysis includes field data gathered on the number of concussions sustained by 1,159 high school players of various ages and skill levels from 14 schools in four states and Canada during the 2013 football season.  Results showed a significant reduction in the occurrence of concussions by players who used Unequal in various brands and styles of football helmets manufactured by Schutt®, Riddell® and Xenith®.

"The concussion rates of the high school football players that used Unequal are impressive," said Dr. Stephens.  He surmises that Unequal's military grade composite, formulated with Kevlar® and Accelleron, is likely the reason Unequal outperforms typical foam pads.  Quantitatively, the 323 high school players that chose to use Unequal had a 1% concussion rate.  The 836 players that did not use Unequal had a 9% concussion rate."

Also there was an unanticipated benefit of Unequal in which players seemed to have a boost in confidence and what they described as a 'mental edge.'  They commented that impacts did not hurt their heads as much or at all, unlike before when they were resigned to football being a 'headache sport,' especially after games or practices.  "That is encouraging news to parents, coaches and athletes and will hopefully keep players in the game longer and safer," said Stephens.  "The implications are compelling because this technology can help students both on the field and in the classroom as well as help reverse the downward participation trend in contact sports today," he said.

After evaluating the Virginia Tech study on concussion probability, Intertek certified impact tests, concussion rates among surveyed players, ImPACT® neurocognitive data plus his own personal experiences with Unequal, Dr. Stephens concurs with world-renowned neurosurgeons, Dr. Julian Bailes and Dr. Joseph Maroon, that football helmets with Unequal predict a significantly lower risk of concussions.

Concussions are the sports epidemic of our age.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are 1.6 to 3.8 million sports-related concussions in the United States annually.  Because of what he has uncovered, Dr. Stephens believes that scholastic institutions, medical advisory boards as well as parents, coaches, trainers and athletes should closely evaluate the benefits of Unequal.

Dr. Stephens is available for interviews.  Please direct all inquiries to Kim Miller, kim@klmpr.com.

About Dr. Chad Stephens
Dr. Stephens is fellowship- trained in sports medicine and interventional pain, pain board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and holds a CAQ in Sports Medicine.  He is also the football Team Doctor for Liberty Christian High School.  Recently, Liberty Christian was voted the number one private school in Texas when considering academics, athletics and the arts.

PDF - http://origin-qps.onstreammedia.com/origin/multivu_archive/ENR/87143-FX-NE26443-20140513-PDF.pdf

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