Fort Hood shooting brings back painful memories for families - KCTV5

Fort Hood shooting brings back painful memories for Independence family

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Wednesday's attack immediately revived memories of the shocking November 2009 assault on Fort Hood, which was the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history. Thirteen people were killed and more than 30 wounded. Wednesday's attack immediately revived memories of the shocking November 2009 assault on Fort Hood, which was the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history. Thirteen people were killed and more than 30 wounded.
INDEPENDENCE, MO (KCTV/AP) -

An Iraq War veteran being treated for mental illness opened fire Wednesday on fellow service members at the Fort Hood military base, killing three people and wounding 16 before committing suicide at the same post where more than a dozen people were slain in a 2009 attack, authorities said.

The shooter apparently walked into a building and began firing a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued firing before entering another building.

He was eventually confronted by military police in a parking lot. As he came within 20 feet of an officer, the gunman put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The officer drew her own weapon, and the suspect put his gun to his head and pulled the trigger a final time, according to Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley, senior officer on the base.

Wednesday's attack immediately revived memories of the shocking November 2009 assault on Fort Hood, which was the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history. Thirteen people were killed and more than 30 wounded.

As soon as Peggy McCarty, of Independence, heard the news, it immediately brought her back to that dark day when her daughter was wounded in that shooting.

"When I first heard it, my heart just stopped. I feel for the families. I know what they're going through," she said.

In 2009, when McCarty heard about the shooting, she was frantic to get a hold of her daughter, Sgt. Keara Bono.

"She wouldn't respond to my phone calls. She wouldn't respond to my texts. And then when I finally did get a phone call, it was one of her battle buddies telling me that she was shot," McCarty said.

Until an all-clear siren sounded hours after Wednesday's shooting began, relatives of soldiers waited anxiously for news about their loved ones.

"I know it is probably hard they can't get a hold of their loved ones, and they aren't able to be able to talk to them or find out if everybody's OK," McCarty said.

McCarty's daughter was shot in the head and the back by Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan, who was convicted and sentenced to death last year in the mass shooting.

Hasan said he acted to protect Islamic insurgents abroad from American aggression.

According to testimony during Hasan's trial last August, Hasan walked inside carrying two weapons and several loaded magazines, shouted "Allahu Akbar!" — Arabic for "God is great!" — and opened fire with a handgun.

The rampage ended when Hasan was shot in the back by Fort Hood police officers. He was paralyzed from the waist down and is now on death row at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas.

McCarty still suffers from anxiety, and her daughter suffers from posttraumatic stress disorder.

After Wednesday's shooting, McCarty said her daughter had a bad anxiety attack and was upset.

"She had to turn off the news and shut down Facebook. She just has to get away from it all, which is that same as what I have to do," she said.

McCarty says she's hopes after the second tragedy at Fort Hood, the military installation will work toward making the post safer for the soldiers.

"I would have hoped that something could be put in place so that they could work on their security. Something has to be done to stop all this violence. It's just not right," she said.

After the 2009 Fort Hood shooting, the military tightened security at bases nationwide.

Those measures included issuing security personnel long-barreled weapons, adding an insider-attack scenario to their training and strengthening ties to local law enforcement. The military also joined an FBI intelligence-sharing program aimed at identifying terror threats.

In September, a former Navy man opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard, leaving 13 people dead, including the gunman. After that shooting, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the Pentagon to review security at all U.S. defense installations worldwide and examine the granting of security clearances that allow access to them.

Asked Wednesday about security improvements in the wake of the shootings, Hagel said, "Obviously when we have these kinds of tragedies on our bases, something's not working."

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