Minister, Air Force sergeant accused of child abuse - KCTV5

Minister, Air Force sergeant accused of child abuse

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Kirk Devine, a local minister and Air Force master sergeant, is accused of physically abusing his 12-year-old son. Kirk Devine, a local minister and Air Force master sergeant, is accused of physically abusing his 12-year-old son.
LIBERTY, MO (KCTV) -

Kirk Devine, a local minister and Air Force master sergeant, is accused of physically abusing his 12-year-old son.

The Clay County Sheriff's Office says Devine beat his son in their Gladstone home on Valentine's Day for more than five hours, calling it a "whoppin."

Devine was booked into the Clay County Detention Center Wednesday afternoon.

A judge set Devine's bond at $10,000. He will be arraigned on Thursday. If convicted, Devine faces up to seven years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

Clay County authorities say it was one of the worst cases of child abuse they have seen.

According to court documents, the boy's stepmother and Devine's estranged wife notified authorities after one of her daughters said the boy had been beaten badly. She said she and her daughters moved out of the Gladstone home nearly a year ago, but she said she couldn't take the boy because she doesn't have legal rights to him.

Once she learned the boy had been beaten, she rushed to the home and removed the children, which included her daughter who was spending time with Devine, according to court documents. She then called police.

The boy told police that his father beat him after he received two bad grades and when teachers said he talked too much in class.

Warning. The following is graphic.

Devine whipped the boy with a belt and television and computer laptop cords after ordering the boy to strip to his underwear, according to court documents.

The boy told authorities that his father "made him hold his hands out to his side and whenever he dropped his hands that his father would punch him in the stomach or gut." He was also ordered to stand on one foot for long periods and whipped with the cord any time he put down a foot or arm, according to court documents.

The boy said at one point that he grabbed the computer cord but his father knocked him to the ground and applied "a pressure point" to his neck and shoulder area, according to court documents.

The boy says the abuse started at 6:30 p.m. and didn't end until 11:45 p.m. The boy was struck so often and so hard that the computer cord broke, according to court documents.

The bloodied boy was ordered to clean off the blood from a chair, repair the broken cords and bathe, according to court documents. The child said he couldn't go to school the next day because he was in too much pain to sit in class.

Doctors and nurses at Children's Mercy treated the boy once his stepmom called authorities days later. A medical examination found multiple injuries both old and new to the boy's body, according to a police report.

Children's Mercy staff members say injuries on the boy's arms, chest, stomach, shoulders, back, buttocks and legs are consistent with being repeatedly struck by a cord or belt, according to police. The boy still had swelling on his arms, thighs and legs five days after he said his father beat him.

He also had scabbing and open sores in a number of locations on his body, a sheriff's office detective said.

"It was pretty severe," Detective Becky Nourse said.

Devine was in jail and could not be reached for comment.

He told police that he struck his son up to a dozen times, including when he was in his underwear. He said he did see blood on his son's body and ordered him to shower, according to court documents.

Devine "admitted he did take it too far," according to court documents.

Officials took 200 pictures of the boy's injuries.

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