New Details Arise About Sting That Busted KCK Officers - KCTV5

New Details Arise About Sting That Busted KCK Officers

The Kansas City, Kan., Police Department is in the beginning stages of an internal investigation after allegations of police misconduct.
Chief Rick Armstrong said the department has requested help from the FBI, the U.S. Attorney's Office and the Wyandotte County District Attorney's Office to complete the investigation.
Armstrong said at a news conference Wednesday that four officers have been suspended without pay while the investigation continued. He said the department valued the public's trust and would do what was necessary to rebuild that trust.
He said the investigation began a few months ago after a tip from the public.
"We're all sick about it," he said. "Our first reaction yesterday was to be sick to your stomach. It's embarrassing."
Mayor Joe Reardon also issued a short statement Wednesday regarding the investigation. He said it was important for the department to maintain its integrity and the public's trust. He said misconduct would not be tolerated. He declined to answer questions.
United States Attorney Barry Grissom and Wyandotte County District Attorney Jerome Gorman both said any discussion of possible charges was premature at this point.

Sources told KCTV5 on Tuesday that the FBI set up a sting to watch the SCORE unit -- or SWAT team -- as it served a search warrant and that's when officers were taken into custody. The house used for the sting is located on Everette Road, just a flew blocks away from KCK police headquarters.Two workers at the house Wednesday confirmed they got a call from the FBI to fix the front door.
"She said earlier this week she saw a van and men had unloaded some things. She thought she was getting a new neighbor," said Elizabeth Yang. Her mother-in-law lives near the house.

What Yang's mother-in-law actually saw, according to sources, were FBI agents moving in just enough items to make the officers believe a warrant they were going to serve was legitimate. In reality, the house has been vacant for years, according to neighbors. Sources also said the FBI put surveillance cameras in the home and planted money throughout the house.
Sources said agents and high ranking KCK police officials watched as the agents entered the house and cameras recorded their every move. As soon as the warrant was finished being served, the officers were handcuffed, questioned and arrested.
Police did not say Wednesday where the officers were being held.
The Fraternal Order of Police said Wednesday that it would decline to comment until more information is known about the accusations against the officers.


It's unclear if the officers spent any time at the Wyandotte County Jail overnight, but jail administrator Jeff Fewell said they would take special precautions if the officers were housed there.
"It's a high-risk situation, so it would be a deputy on a cell lockdown situation," Fewell said. "You would have a deputy on each cell, providing security. There'd be no movement, no communications, no showers, no telephone. And, again, it's all about custody control, safety and security."
Fewell said the officers would not be kept at the jail for long because they will likely appear before the federal magistrate and then go to the detention center in Lansing.
The Police Department said it will release more information about its investigation when it becomes available.


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